Canadian Oil Sands - COS 

CPE Credits Awarded: 2
Categories: Oil Industry, Online Training

Canadian Oil Sands is an online training course that will introduce the student to the oil sands sector and the operations used to cost effectively exploit this resource. The drivers behind this development will also be presented, as well as the economics and the potential markets for this resource. Upon completion of this course, you’ll have a sound understanding of the rapidly developing Alberta oil sands sector, as well as the processes and techniques used to source, upgrade and market bitumen.

There are no pre-requisites for this course and no advance preparation is required.

Programme Level:  Basic

Course Code:  COS

Industry:  The Oil Industry

Course Length:  2 hours

CPE Credits:  2 self-study CPE credits awarded for this course

You will learn to:

    - Point out why oil sands have become an increasingly important source of supply
    - Identify the drivers behind the accelerated growth and how production of this resource has shifted from small-scale operations to large commercial projects
    - Distinguish between the pros and cons of in-situ production techniques
    - Identify how products are transported
    - Choose the costs, market conditions and the project development necessary for oil sands development to continue
    - Identify the growing concerns and opposition to oil sands development
    - Recognize how increasing oil sands production is having a significant effect on global markets and the pricing of crude oil

Practice exercises and self-assessment quizzes are included to help reinforce key topics introduced throughout the course.

A comprehensive final test will be given at the end of the course.

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Email us at info@mennta.com

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Mennta Energy Solutions (formerly The Oxford Princeton Programme, Inc.) is not affiliated with Princeton University, Oxford University, or Oxford University Press.